OTHER RECENT ARTICLES

A diverse group of four female leaders in higher ed faces the camera February 7

Petty Principles for Women in Higher Education: Realistic and Practical Advice for Success in Higher Education Leadership

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According to recent research, women in higher education continue to consistently be underrepresented at the administrative levels of dean, chief academic officers, provost, and president (Gallant, 2014). There are numerous motives identified by researchers for the persistence of the underrepresentation


Group of academic leaders discuss in library January 17

Developing Critical Cross-cultural Communicative Competence in Academic Leaders

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According to Chun and Evans (2018), continued white hegemonic practices in university and college administration and faculty have failed to develop a representative institutional culture and organizational structure that is responsive to the needs of diverse students and faculty. The


December 17, 2018

Pitfalls of Using Student Comments in the Evaluation of Faculty

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The use—or misuse—of student ratings of instruction (SRIs) in faculty evaluation is a frequent topic in higher education news. Unfortunately, popular press articles on the topic often garner more attention than the vast empirical literature. A recent review of the research by Linse (2017) pointed to common misperceptions about SRIs, offering administrators evidence-based advice on appropriate SRI interpretation.


December 10, 2018

Teaching and Learning Centers as Catalysts for Faculty Diversity Development

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Consider the experience of Jordan, a fourth-year political science major, who was told by his professor that many African-American students do not pass her class (Brooms, 2017). This stereotyping can create a self-fulfilling prophecy, or what Claude Steele describes as a “stereotype threat,” which impacts students’ performance by challenging their academic ability or competence.  


December 3, 2018

Petty Principles for Leaders in Higher Education

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Higher education leaders have an opportunity to make an impact on the education and development of a diverse population of students and help them become contributing citizens in society. However, the job comes with a myriad of challenges that can confound both novice and experienced leaders alike.

In this post, I offer seven tips to help guide academic decision-making. In a play on my last name, I call them “petty principles.”